Monthly Archives: November 2018

Price powers ahead in the heat

Toby Price in action at the Dakar Rally: Picture: Getty ImagesTOBY PRICE thrived in the heat on the Fiambala sand dunesto extend his advantage in the Dakar Rally to almost half an hour in stage nine as main rival Paulo Goncalves dropped off the pace.
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The Hunter rider was seven minutes and 10 seconds faster than the next-best, Honda’s Kevin Benavides, on provisional times at check point two ofthe loop circuit at Belen in Argentina when thestage was called off early because of extreme heat. Price also had an overall lead of 24:47.

However, Price’s lead extended to 28:59from KTM teammate Stefan Svitko on adjusted timesand his stage advantage pushed to 12:29. American Ricky Brabec was moved up to second on the stage.

Pricestarted the day 2:05 ahead of Goncalvesand had extended that lead by three minutes at check point one. His Portuguese rival’s hopeswerethen crippled when abranch put a hole in his radiator. He slowed down before stopping at CP2 to attempt stop-gap repairs.

Price headed towards the finish line with eleven other competitors and had increasedhis lead en route to a fifth stage winwhen the race was halted.Goncalves’ position was uncertain until given a group time later on Wednesday (AEDT). Goncalves was given 13thon the stage,31:56behind Price, to be third overall and34:01off the pace. Although still in the race, Goncalves will have to fix his bike without assistance from mechanics because stage nine is the first in a two-day marathon section where competitors receive no outside support in between races.

Stage 9 highlightsPrice, 28,was initially disappointed not to extend his lead even further after powering through the testing conditions to reach the finish line.

“It’s been a good day, I can’t complain. I get to the finishing line and then they cancel the rest of it… That’s a bit of a shame, but that’s the way it is. We’ll just have to wait and see and see what call they come up with,” he said.

“It’s a bit of a bummer for me… I have to get to the finishing line and I’ve done that, but they’ve called it. I guess that’s just the way it is.

“It’s job done today, but everyone’s got lucky since we’ve stopped at CP1 and CP2. We’ll see if it will be all good. The bike seems really good, really strong and still going really well. The mechanics have done a really good job over the lead-up to the race and during the event.

“I think we’re cruising along alright, so we can’t complain. For the lead over Paulo, maybe; maybe not… we’ll just have to wait and see for the decision”.

Stage 10 is a278km special with a total distance of561km fromBelen to La Rioja. Itpresents the longest dune section in the history of the Dakar.

need2know: Positive open in store after Wall St rallies late

The main US equity benchmark’s tumble to start 2016 has left it 9.1 per cent below its all-time high set in May. Photo: Michael AppletonLocal shares are set to open higher as shares rallied on Wall Street after crude oil dropped below $US30 a barrel overnight, for the first time in twelve years, then pared its losses.
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What you need2know

SPI futures up 26 points to 4906

The Australian dollar is buying 69.79 US cents, 81.97 Japanese yen, 64.21 Euro cents  and 48.34 British pence

On Wall St, late, Dow +0.4%, S&P 500 +0.1%, Nasdaq +0.6%

In Europe, Stoxx 50 +1.2%, FTSE +1%, CAC +1.5%, DAX +1.6%

In London, BHP -2.9%, Rio -2.7%

Spot gold -0.4% to $US1090.02 at 2.50pm New York time

Brent crude -2.5% to $US30.75 at 2.23pm New York time

US oil -3.2% to $US30.40 per barrel

Iron ore is fetching $US41.19 per tonne

What’s on today

Economy: China trade balance for December; US MBA mortgage applications, US budget statement, Federal Reserve Beige Book. Two Fed policymakers will speak: Eric Rosengren, Charles Evans.

Stocks in focus

Price targets and recommendations for global miners are being reset. Overnight Barclays, HSBC and Jefferies cut BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto among others. BHP was cut to “underweight” by Barclays and to “reduce” by HSBC; Jefferies cut its London price target, though it has a  “buy” on the stock.

Currencies

China has stepped up its defense of the yuan, with the People’s Bank of China repeatedly intervening in the offshore market on Tuesday, according to people familiar with the matter. The yuan traded in Hong Kong rose 0.43 per cent to 6.5850 a dollar, according to prices compiled by Bloomberg. The currency in Shanghai advanced 0.11 per cent to 6.5767, leaving a spread of 0.2 per cent. That’s compared with a record 2.9 per cent reached last week.

The yen rose as investors went back to seeking haven investments. Japan’s currency strengthened versus all of its Group-of-10 peers save for the Norwegian krone. The dollar rose versus the euro to $US1.0833.

Britain’s pound fell against all its major counterparts after data showed UK industrial production unexpectedly contracted in November.

Commodities

US oil fell below $US30 a barrel in mid afternoon trade in New York on Tuesday, before paring its losses. The rout for oil though appears intact. Oil prices have become detached from the fundamentals of supply and demand, making a plunge to $US10 a barrel possible, according to Standard Chartered. “No fundamental relationship is currently driving the oil market towards any equilibrium,” London-based head of commodities research Paul Horsnell wrote. “Prices could fall as low as $US10 a barrel before most of the money managers in the market conceded that matters had gone too far.”

Iron ore may tumble below $US35 a metric ton as steel mills in China face weak demand at home and increasing barriers to exports, according to Australia & New Zealand Banking Group. The steel-making raw material will remain weak through March and trade between $US35 and $US40, the bank forecasts in an emailed report. The probability of prices declining below this range in the short term is “rising daily”, ANZ said.​

Nickel prices slid to their weakest levels in over 12 years, amid worries about high inventories, while copper sunk to fresh 6-1/2 year lows on persistent worries over China’s economy. LME three-month nickel, which was the worst performer on the LME last year with losses of over 40 per cent, tumbled to $US8120 a tonne, the lowest since May 2003, before paring losses to close at $US8220, a decline of 0.6 per cent.

Benchmark LME copper hit another multi-year low, ending down 0.7 per cent at $US4355 a tonne, its weakest since May 2009.

United States

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index erased a rally of 1.2 per cent in afternoon trade, as the plunge in commodities overwhelmed optimism sparked by China’s renewed efforts to shore up its currency. The Nasdaq Composite Index was on track for the longest losing streak since 1984.

The main US equity benchmark’s tumble to start 2016 has left it 9.1 per cent below its all-time high set in May. It is 3.7 per cent above the bottom of an August swoon, which was also sparked by anxiety over the impact of China’s weakness on worldwide growth.

Europe

A rally in car makers pushed European stocks to their best performance of the year as investors assessed valuations following a four-day losing streak. Auto-related companies rose the most on the Stoxx Europe 600 Index after an industry association forecast an acceleration in Chinese sales in 2016. Energy stocks reversed gains, falling after oil retreated toward a 12-year low. Declines of more than 2.6 per cent each in Rio Tinto Group and BHP Billiton dragged a gauge of miners to its lowest level since July 2003 as commodity prices slipped.

The Stoxx 600 rose 0.9 per cent to 343.22 at the close of trading, paring an earlier advance of as much as 1.9 per cent. After a 7 per cent slide this year through yesterday, shares are trading at 14.4 times projected earnings, the lowest in about a year.

Goldman Sachs sees the Stoxx 600 rallying 18 per cent in the next 12 months from Monday’s close, about double the gains it estimates for the S&P 500. Last week’s rout changed nothing to its outlook. The bank forecasts profit growth of 8 per cent for Stoxx 600 companies this year, compared with 5.7 per cent for the average analyst projection compiled by Bloomberg.

What happened yesterday

A strong start to the Australian sharemarket turned sour on Tuesday, as declining commodity prices weighed heavily on resources and energy stocks. The benchmark index ultimately ended 0.1 per cent, or 7 points, lower at 4925.1, chalking up an eighth straight decline. The All Ordinaries closed 0.2 per cent, or 8 points, lower at 4982.2.

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‘Healthy’ smoothies worse than a Big Mac

Gloria Jean’s Mango Fruzie may be 98 per cent fat-free, but it has twice the sugar of a soft drink. Photo: Gloria JeansHealth experts are dismayed that summer smoothies marketed as “98 per cent fat free” and “with an abundance of nutrition” contain more kilojoules than a Big Mac, and are urging consumers to steer clear.
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A survey of 40 popular smoothies, frappes and shakes found Gloria Jean’s “98 per cent fat free” Mango Fruzie in a large size had the highest amount of sugar, containing an alarming 123 grams or 31 teaspoons’ worth.

The Mango Fruzie has nearly double the sugar content of a 600ml bottle of Coca-Cola Classic, rocketing its kilojoule level to beyond that of a McDonald’s Big Mac.

“Food outlets use phrases like 97 per cent ‘fat free’ or ‘dairy free’ to make their smoothies and frappes sound healthy, but … these drinks can actually do more harm than good,” said Alison Ginn from Livelighter, the government-funded program that conducted the survey.

The World Health Organisation’s new nutrient guideline shows added sugars should make up no more than 5 per cent of an adult and child’s daily energy intake – or six teaspoons per day – for the biggest health benefit.

“Like with soft drinks and other sugary drinks, regular consumption of frappes and smoothies can contribute to weight gain and a build up of toxic fat around your organs, which increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers,” Ms Ginn said.

Half of the 40 store-bought drinks analysed had more kilojoules than a Big Mac, including the healthy-sounding Mango Fruzie and two from Boost Juice.

Boost Juice’s Brekkie to Go-Go Super in large was loaded with 24 per cent more kilojoules than a Big Mac and its Black Label Protein Supreme “with an abundance of nutrition”, also in large, 12 per cent more.

The researchers only took the amount of kilojoules, fat and sugar into account. They did not consider the amount of dietary fibre, for example, and its benefits.

McDonald’s Mocha Frappe and Coffee Kick Frappe, both in large, had the greatest amount of saturated fat – about 21.7 grams each – double that of a Big Mac, which has 10.7 grams.

The average Australian should not consume more than 16 grams of saturated fat per day

“Milkshakes, thickshakes, iced coffees and frappes, which are laden with cream and/or ice cream, were also alarmingly high in saturated fat – some have more saturated fat than we should consume in an entire day,” said Roni Beauchamp from Heart Foundation Victoria.

“For good health we should aim to limit saturated fats in our diet as they can raise cholesterol levels and put us at greater risk of heart disease.”

Of all 40 summer drinks analysed, McDonald’s Large Mocha Frappe was deemed the worst. It had the highest amount of kilojoules, fat and saturated fat.

“If you do decide to have one of these drinks, you can limit the damage by asking for skim milk, choosing the smallest cup size available and sharing with a friend. Better yet, make your own version at home so you know exactly what you’re drinking,” said Ms Beauchamp.

UPDATE:

A spokeswomen for Boost Juice said comparing its products to that of a Big Mac or a soft drink was not a true comparison because of the empty calories in junk food.

“When you are consuming something that contains wholesome ingredients such as fruit, vegetables or milk, your body is getting important nutrients, which this study did not take into consideration. All Boost Juice’s nutritional information is readily available in-store and online,” she said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Tori-Lee Hillery thought she was going to die during assault by ex-boyfriend Kyron Dryden

Tori-Lee Hillery says she thought she was going to die during the assault. Photo: Simone De Peak Kyron Dryden has been found guilty of assaulting his ex-girlfriend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll
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“I’ve watched him fight, I knew what he was capable of,” Tori-Lee Hillery said of Kyron Dryden. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Kyron Dryden found guilty of assaulting ex-girlfriend

For a shocking few minutes last September the former girlfriend of professional boxer Kyron Dryden believed she was going to join Australia’s most horrifying list – the one woman a week to die at the hands of a partner or former partner.

“I’ve watched him train. I’ve watched him fight. I knew what he was capable of,” Tori-Lee Hillery said.

“I thought, I’m going to die,” Ms Hillery, 21, said of the terror she felt on the night Dryden, 22, grabbed her by the throat and slammed her into a mirror and “choke-slammed” her to the floor.

He then called her a “stupid slut” in a film of the incident he later posted on social media.

Dryden was found guilty on Monday of assault causing actual bodily harm, and pleaded guilty to breaching apprehended violence orders four times that required him not to make contact with Ms Hillery.

She agreed to speak to the Newcastle Herald, backed by Victims of Crime Assistance League chief executive Robyn Cotterell-Jones, after months of being vilified on social media after Dryden was charged, culminating in an ugly outpouring of commentary after his conviction.

It included that she was a “lying c—“, a “witch”, a “f—ing bitch”, a “stupid bitch”, a “slut”, that Dryden had yet to tell “the full story” and Ms Hillery deserved being assaulted nearly two months after her relationship with Dryden ended.

The commentary included Dryden saying he was “unfazed and carefree about the situation” because he had “bigger things on my mind”.

Ms Hillery said the social media response was “worse than the assault in some ways”.

“If I’d seen this happen to another girl I don’t know if I would have reported it, but if no one says anything this will never stop.

“I would say to these people who’ve written these things, never, ever, ever shame a victim as you have no idea how deeply it affects their lives already.

“Domestic violence victims don’t want your sympathy, and they definitely don’t want your opinion either.”

Ms Cotterell-Jones said the social media commentary had reached “new lows in savaging the victim”, and was “like a cancer” that would silence other victims.

“The magistrate found one party to be honest, the other not,” she said.

“People have to recognise that when anyone, hero or not, commits a crime and is found guilty on the evidence in a court of law, blaming the victim will silence others from trying to be safe.”

Ms Hillery said she “never ever thought” Dryden would physically assault her. In text messages sent by Dryden to her after their relationship ended in July last year, he repeatedly demanded to see her. In one, he said “Your [sic] seeing me I wanna see you, that’s it, I steal you if I gotta.”

After he was charged, Dryden repeatedly breached apprehended violence orders requiring him not to contact Ms Hillery.

The NSW government’s Combat Sports Authority, which is responsible for licensing and monitoring boxing and has a “fit and proper person” test as part of its registration that lists serious assault as a relevant consideration, said it was aware of Dryden’s conviction.

The authority can take disciplinary action which “may affect the status” of a boxer’s registration.

Dryden, who won an International Boxing Organisation (IBO) world youth title in November, could also face action from the IBO, its Asia Pacific vice-president Steve Scott said.

The IBO board will consider the case after Dryden is sentenced, with the possibility that he could be stripped of the title if a custodial sentence was given, Mr Scott said.

“We await the sentencing to be completed and we hope that justice is done for all in this case,” he said.

Ms Hillery said she hoped that, by speaking to police and giving evidence in the trial, she gave other women the courage to speak.

She called on people to support women when they report domestic violence. She called on people to think before they posted commentary on social media.

“After he was charged, people were saying on social media that the truth would come out in the court. We’ve been to court and the truth’s come out,” she said.

Newcastle Herald

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Sydney show officials crowing over Canberra chook coup

An Australian Game fowl looks down on a Modern Game bantam at the Royal Canberra National Poultry Show. The 2016 show will be held in Sydney. Photo: Rohan Thomson Two of the birds entered in the Royal Canberra National Poultry Show in 2015. Photo: Graham Tidy
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Australia’s pinnacle poultry show, previously held in Canberra every four years, will be held in Sydney in June.

It means Canberra has lost a popular Queen’s Birthday weekend event that four years ago drew 10,000 people, including poultry exhibitors from around Australia, 58 judges, including guest judges from Britain and New Zealand, and 5500 prize-winning chooks and ducks.

Sydney show officials are crowing. Royal Agricultural Society of NSW president Murray Wilton says it is the top event on the poultry calendar.

“This is also exciting for Sydney Royal as it means providing greater engagement in agriculture outside of the Easter Show,” Mr Wilton said. “The show is also popular with the general public and attracts a solid crowd, including lots of families.”

The last national show in Canberra attracted so many chooks, guinea fowl, turkeys, geese and bantams that another 1000 entries were knocked back.

RAS NSW poultry coordinator Kerry Pearce says Canberra were not prepared to take on the show for 2016.

“Rather than let the show go, Sydney has decided to take it up. That cuts a long story short,” Mr Pearce said.

“They don’t have enough pens to actually stage the show down there. That’s the bottom line. They had to to borrow pens from Sydney, all of the Sydney poultry show pens had to be transferred through to Canberra,” he said.

“Each time they were trucked down, damage was occurring to the pens. For the replacement cost of all of those pens, going between Sydney and Canberra every four years, our pens were starting to get really badly damaged. The committee weren’t very happy about doing that every four years, so they [Canberra] could do that show.”

A long time Canberra poultry show organiser, Bruce Patterson, said if new cages could be built he would help to build them. Materials would cost $300,000.

“I don’t know if [Sydney] will be a huge success. There won’t be accommodation near the event, like there is in Canberra. I will support the show, I would hate to see it fall over,” Mr Patterson said.

Chief executive Garry Ashby said Canberra RAS did not have resources to hold up to 6000 birds over the long weekend. Even if it could afford the cost, it no longer had access to Sydney’s show cages.

“With insurance, the cost was prohibitive, it was over $60,000. Those costs have to be passed on to the poultry exhibitors, it would have been exorbitant prices for them to do the entries,” Mr Ashby said.

“We tried to chase sponsorship – in the end it was being able to access those cages as well and we weren’t able to get that access at this time,” Mr Ashby said.

Mr Ashby said problems arose from having damaged cages arrive in Canberra.

“They had to be fixed here, and when they were taken back, the same thing happened again. They are not a standard fitting cage, when they are flattened down they don’t sit on a pallet, they go across a pallet, it is difficult logistically to move so many cages. You are talking something in the order of four b-double trucks.”

Mr Ashby said more discussions would be held with Sydney in an attempt to return the show to Canberra in the future.

The show will be held from Thursday, June 9, to Sunday, June 12, and includes a big auction and sale, and a presentation evening on the Saturday .

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