Monthly Archives: January 2019

Jets have little to lose in taking more risks

LINCHPIN: Leonardo is pivotal to reviving the Jets’ attacking fortunes against Wellington on Sunday. Picture: Getty ImagesTHE Jets have not scored in six games. Their ninegoals in 14 games this season is the worst in the A-League by some distance,six fewerthan Perth’s 15. They rank last for shots and for shots on target. Only four Jets players have scored this season.
南京夜网

Interestingly, according to Opta, the A-League’ssports data supplier, the Jets rank fourth in the league for what it terms “big chances”, with 27, but last in conversion rate, at just 22%, which lends credence to captain Nigel Boogaard’s observation this week that “as a group we are creating the chances”.

However you look at it, the side’s attack has been poor, even accounting for yet another disjointed preparation in the hangover from Nathan Tinkler’s sorry regime.

The mantra at training this week has been that the team do not need to change their approach and that the goals, and results, will eventually come.

“We’ve got ourgame plan, and we’re not going to shy away from that,” defender Daniel Mullen said.“We’re not going to change it. We know that it works.’’

Nevertheless, on Sunday, the Jets are at home toWellington, who have not won outside New Zealand since round two, have themselves scored only once in three games and are missing six-goal striker Roy Krishna.

Coach Scott Millerhas not apologised for sending his side out with a conservative mindset. A horrible defensive record last season (55 goals in 27 games) needed fixing, and to a large extent he has done that.

But it will be interesting to see whether he regards this weekend as a chance to take some risksand bank on his team’s improved resilience.

What are his options? Introducingyoung legsoff the bench earlier in the game? Committing more troops forward?The fans won’t hang him for trying.

Much will depend on whether Leonardo is fit, as the team’s counter-attack pivots off the littleBrazilian, takingpressure off David Carney. The No.10 tends to cheat a little when the team is under pressure, and they will need his positional sense and ability to beat the first defender to open up a Phoenix defence which has conceded 22 goals in 14 games.

Leonardo has trained through the heat this week after a month out injured and appears likely to start.

The transfer window swung open 10 days ago, and the FFA-owned Jets have made no signings to boost their attack, but it is hard to believe that, with a few hundred thousand in the kitty, they won’t find reinforcements before it closes.

On the plus side, Carney and Mark Birighitti are still at the club, despite rumoured interest from abroad, and Miller has signed OlyrooSteven Ugarkovic.

Ugarkovic looks like the kind of midfielder the Jets need, a mobile, technically strong player who can play the ball forward thenlink with teammates further up the pitch. For all the talk of the final third, this is an area of the Jets’ game which has been lacking for years.It is too much to ask that one player, let alone a 21-year-old, can transformthe team, but Jetsfans will see any change as good change.

BIG WHINGE

An optimist sees the glass as half full, a pessimist sees the glass as half empty.
南京夜网

The whinger sees their glass as half empty with a lipstick stain and a chip and tells you they’re not really thirsty anyway, so why’d you bring them a drink?

We wouldn’t want to live in a world where people didn’t have the chance to complain. It’s how things get done better, we give feedback and sometimes we can find the solutions.

We all know a chronic complainer: they send dishes back at a restaurant, complain it’s too hot in summer and too cold in winter, their boss is a tyrant, their partner’s lazy and the kids don’t come and visit any more. (I wonder why!)

For some people, it seems that no matter what good fortune life brings them, there will always be something that they cancomplain about.

Won Lotto? It’s a burden to manage the tax. Bought a new house on the beach? Everything rusts too fast.

It’s like we have a homeostasis for happiness – after we have recovered from the initial horror of a tough time or the joy of a good time, we end up pretty much back where we started with regards to our own happiness.

(This is true for those who have won huge Lotto payments – six months later many people are as happy as before the won the money).

It can be a real downer to be around chronic complainers.

Sometimes complainers just want to be heard and those around them are in the habit of not listening to them because they are “over it”.

It becomes a vicious cycle – the more people ignore them and their view that the world is unfair, the more they need to seek connection to others in the only way they know how – complaining!

Sometimes it’s possible forwhingers to break the habit.

They can realise their glass might actually be full (they only fill the glass up to the halfway line these days) and can be poured into another glass without any problem.

Tarnya Davis is currently on holidays. This is a ‘best of’ column. Tarnyais a clinical psychologistand principal of NewPsychPsychologists,newpsych南京夜网419论坛Her book of columns,All Things Considered, is on sale at theherald南京夜网419论坛

Why I became an Elena Ferrante addict

CATCHING THE FERRANTE BUG
南京夜网

I emerged into the new year feeling raw and removed from the physical world after six weeks’ holiday in which, among other things, I read the four novels in Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan series. The books had been piling up beside my bed since Text Publishing brought out the English translation of My Brilliant Friend in 2013 until the final volume, The Story of the Lost Child, appeared last October. People (mostly women) told me that once you began reading you couldn’t stop and it’s true: I joined the army of addicts. If ever I pulled out my book in a cafe I was accosted by a woman who wanted to share: “So you’ve got the Ferrante bug,” whispered one. For me the fascination was first with the intimate first-person narration of the friendship between two women from childhood to middle-age, through love affairs, careers, motherhood, and their intense but ruthless bond, compromised by jealous rivalry; with the emotional nuances that change moment by moment like clouds. And then with the underlying portrait of the poverty, politics and crime of late 20th-century Naples and Italy. At times I wanted to abandon the characters to their small-minded meanness but I had to know if they would pull themselves out of the mess. Some did, many didn’t. Sometimes, as crisis piled upon crisis, I agreed with the odd critics who dismiss the books as soap opera. But mostly I felt I was in the company of a frank companion who confided a story of women’s survival despite the obstacles put up by society, men and their own bad choices. If you read Jennifer Levasseur’s email interview with Ferrante in Spectrum in December, you know the author is an Italian woman who writes under a pseudonym and guards her privacy. This adds to the allure of the books, which she admits draw on her life. There are clues for readers and lessons for writers in the text as the narrator, Elena Greco, carves out a writing career. As her fiery friend and alter ego, Lila Cerullo, says near the end: “Only in bad novels people always think the right things, always say the right thing, every effect has its cause, there are the likeable ones and the unlikeable, the good and the bad, everything in the end consoles you.” There is, thankfully, little consolation in these brilliant books. Now I must go back to her earlier novels, The Days of Abandonment, The Lost Daughter and Troubling Love. TOP BOOKS SALES OF 2015

My sense that “everyone” was reading Ferrante was not enough to put her on Nielsen BookScan’s Australian bestseller lists for 2015. At the top of the list, Andy Griffiths’ megaseller 65-Storey Treehouse series for children and adult colouring books propped up sales, while the most popular fiction was E. L. James’ erotic novel Grey. Among literary fiction, Harper Lee’sGo Set a Watchman, Richard Flanagan’s Booker-winning The Narrow Road to the Deep North and Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer winner, All the Light We Cannot See, made the best showing. However, Text says Ferrante’s series has sold a total of 100,000 books in Australia since 2013 and My Brilliant Friend has sat on the independent bookshops’ weekly bestseller list for months. It was the No. 1 bestseller for 2015 at Brisbane bookshop Avid Reader and No. 2 (after The Mindfulness Colouring Book) at Readings bookstores in Melbourne.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Australia v India ODI: game 1photos

Australia v India ODI: game 1 | photos Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images
南京夜网

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

Scenes from Australia’s first one-day international of the season against India. Pic: Getty Images

TweetFacebook

Assault victim feared she would die

Vindicated: Tori-Lee Hillery after a Newcastle magistrate found her to be a witness of truth after her professional boxer former boyfriend assaulted her. Ms Hillery has been vilified on social media for reporting the assault to police. Picture: Simone de Peak. FOR a shocking few minutes lastSeptember the former girlfriend of professional boxer Kyron Dryden believed she was going to joinAustralia’s most horrifying list –the one woman a week to die at the hands of a partner or former partner.
南京夜网

“I’ve watched him train. I’ve watched him fight. I knew what he was capable of,” said Tori-Lee Hillery, 21, of the night Dryden, 22, grabbed her by the throat and slammed her into a mirror, “choke-slammed” her to the floor, and called her a “stupid slut” on a film of the incident he later posted on social media.

“I thought, I’m going to die,” Ms Hillery said of the terror she felt that September day, after Dryden was found guilty on Monday of assault causing actual bodily harm, and pleaded guilty to breaching apprehended violence orders four times that requiredhim not to make contact with her.

She agreed to speak, backed by Victims of Crime Assistance League (VOCAL) chief executive Robyn Cotterell-Jones, after months of being vilified on social media after Dryden was charged, culminatingin an ugly outpouring of commentary after his conviction.

It included that she was a “lying c…”, a “witch”, a “f…ing bitch”, a “stupid bitch”, a “slut”, that Dryden had yet to tell “the full story” and Ms Hillery deserved being assaulted nearly two months after her relationship with Dryden ended.

Kyron Dryden has been found guilty of assaulting his ex-girlfriend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

The commentary included Drydensaying he was“unfazed and carefree about the situation” because he had“bigger things on my mind”.

Ms Hillery said the social media response was“worse than the assault in some ways”.

“If I’d seen this happen to another girl I don’t know if I would have reported it, but if no-one says anything this will never stop.

“I would say to these people who’ve written these things, never, ever, ever shame a victim as you have no idea how deeply it affects their lives already.

“Domestic violence victims don’t want your sympathy, and they definitely don’t want your opinion either.”

​Ms Cotterell-Jones said the social media commentary had reached“new lows in savaging the victim”, and was“like a cancer” that would silence other victims.

“The magistrate found one party to be honest, the other not,” she said.

“People have torecognisethat when anyone, hero or not, commits a crime andis found guiltyon the evidencein a court of law,blaming the victim will silence others from trying to be safe.”

Ms Hillery said she“never ever thought”Dryden would physically assault her. In text messages sent by Dryden to her after their relationship ended in July last year, he repeatedly demanded to see her, including one in which he said“Your (sic) seeing me I wanna see you, that’s it, I steal you if I gotta”.

After he was charged Dryden repeatedly breached apprehended violence orders requiring him not to contact Ms Hillery.

The NSW Government’s Combat Sports Authority, which is responsible for licensing and monitoring boxing and has a “fit and proper person” test as part of its registration that lists serious assault as a relevant consideration, said it was aware of the Dryden conviction.

The authority can take disciplinary action which “may affect the status”of a boxer’s registration.

Dryden, who won an International Boxing Organisation (IBO) world youth title in November, could also face action from the IBO, its Asia Pacific vice president Steve Scott said.

The IBO board will consider the case after Dryden is sentenced, with the possibility that Dryden could be stripped of the title if a custodial sentence was given, Mr Scott said.

“We await the sentencing to be completed and we hope that justice is done for all in this case,” he said.

Ms Hillery said she hoped that by speaking to police and giving evidence in the trial she gave other women the courage to speak. She called on people to support women when they report domestic violence. She called on people to think before they posted commentary on social media.

“After he was charged people were saying on social media that the truth would come out in the court. We’ve been to court and the truth’s come out,” she said.

The Herald, Newcastle